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GUNNAR Optiks Adds New Styles to Available Prescription Frame Offering

GUNNAR Optiks, the world’s leading manufacturer of computer eyewear today announced that they have expanded their collection of prescription available styles in response to increasing demand for custom computer and gaming glasses. GUNNAR continues to focus on developing ergonomically correct solutions to accommodate both prescription and non-prescription digital users.

rx

One of the most annoying issues for those who wear prescription glasses has always been that of glare and being able to wear other protective lenses. Either the wearer switches to contacts to be able to wear things like gaming glasses or sunglasses, or they just live life without ever being able to switch off that horrible glare. Well, GUNNAR Optiks recognizes the portion of the population that wasn’t born with perfect eyesight and has expanded their line of Rx capable frames.

According to The Vision Council, “Digital eye strain is the most common computer-related repetitive strain injury, surpassing carpal tunnel and tendonitis.” They also note a University of Pennsylvania study that found that adults with prescription contact lenses and eyeglasses are more likely to experience symptoms of digital eye strain, including eye, neck and back pain. Experts attribute this to use of prescription eyewear that is not specifically designed for computer or screen viewing. GUNNAR Advanced Computer Eyewear is designed with proper visual ergonomics in mind and addresses specific issues related to digital viewing for people that require corrective lenses.

“As the worldwide leader in computer eyewear, our Rx offering shows our commitment to the hard core computer user,” says Joe Croft, Co-Founder of GUNNAR Optiks. We know that there are general purpose lenses that can be applied to computer use, but we’d compare that to wearing penny loafers to run a marathon. We encourage everyone to get appropriate GUNNARs for the task.”

There is a trend with prescription glasses in the business and gaming community; users are needing Rx lenses earlier and earlier in life. This is most likely due to the use of digital screens earlier in life than previous generations. While the baby boomers didn’t use digital screens full time until later in life, their grandchildren are born with an iPad in hand. This immediate digital influence on developing eyes has possibly caused a shift in the need for prescription lenses. It’s only a logical progression that GUNNAR glasses, already the go-to for protecting your eyes, would fully embrace the prescription market with adapting more of their popular styles for Rx. These styles will be available with GUNNAR Rx lenses or Carl Zeiss premium lenses.

carl_zeiss_visionGUNNARS prescription program is supported and administered by Carl Zeiss Vision, the worldwide leader in precision optics for the last 160 years. GUNNAR HD SINGLE VISION lenses incorporate Carl Zeiss Vision’s premium customized high-definition optics. With technically superior geometry optimized for each prescription, GUNNAR HD SINGLE VISION lenses deliver unsurpassed clarity and wider peripheral viewing without the compromises of traditional prescription lenses. Incorporating addition power, GUNNAR ERGO HD lenses combine Carl Zeiss Vision’s patented high-definition customized lens optics with GUNNAR’S ergonomically designed frames.

GUNNAR offers three options for purchasing custom prescription eyewear; visit a Carl Zeiss Vision authorized eye care provider, visit your personal eye care provider or order prescription GUNNARS online. GUNNAR prescription eyewear is covered by most vision insurance as well as HSA/FSA plans.

GUNNAR has added these four frames, in various colors and lens tints:

InterceptINTERCEPT (Amber tint; Onyx)

HausHAUS (Amber or Crystalline tint; Onyx, Tortoise, Onyx/Fade)

JouleJOULE (Amber or Crystalline tint; Onyx, Tortoise, Amethyst)

VayperVAYPER (Amber tint; Onyx, Mercury, Neptune)

As many prescription eyewear users can attest, they wear their glasses every waking hour. GUNNAR glasses are made to last and while some styles are definitely modeled for late night gaming sessions, many of the computer styles are designed for full-time everyday use. The Amber lenses are designed to block that harsh blue light from digital devices, while the Crystalline lenses are designed to relax and focus the eyes while allowing the full color spectrum to be visible to the user. Crystalline lenses are available in Rx, and aimed towards graphic designers and those who work in true color. Either way, both lenses are designed to protect your eyes every second the glasses are being worn.

As Megu Kobayashi, Director of Interactive Marketing for GUNNAR Optiks points out, Rx glasses can also be used in conjunction with contacts and non-Rx GUNNAR glasses.

“After a long day in front of digital screens with my contacts and non-prescription GUNNARS on, my prescription GUNNARs are a relief for when I get home and remove my contacts. They allow me to continue gaming into the night with no eyestrain.”

For some, that’s the opposite, for others that is just another perfect scenario for prescription GUNNAR glasses.

For more information and to view all the GUNNAR styles available with prescription lenses, please visit: https://www.gunnars.com/rx/

Ergonomics Will Keep You Gaming into the Future

by Curtis Silver

Ergonomics. Over the years the term hasn’t changed the meaning, it means the same today that it did in the 1950s when it was fully accepted as a term and practice. However, it was not until the 2000’s that colleges began to offer it as a course of study towards a masters degree, though its history dates back to ancient Greece. Ergonomics, of course, is the study of designing equipment that fits the human body in physical and cognitive connotations. Where once ergonomics was simply thought to be just keyboard trays and wrist rests, like everything else in the past few decades, it has evolved significantly.

Now ergonomics has become a course study in not only psychology but physiology & behavioral sciences as well. It has become an area of medical concern, a workers compensation standard and something most employers take seriously and are generally willing to pay for if you can demonstrate a need (yes, you can convince your boss to buy you a pair of Gunnars for work.) Ergonomics has become more than just physical comfort in the office but has branched out into many other industries. Though it is in the office environment that we think of ergonomics the most, and while innovations are being made there, they are also being made in gaming ergonomics as well, with a bit of crossover.

Take for instance the concept of the mouse glove. For years this has been an idea of the scientific & engineering community. Probably after seeing Tom Cruise move screens around in Minority Report. Actually, that was the motivation for students at MIT back in 2010 who developed a wireless mouse glove that cost under $100 to produce. There is even earlier research at North Carolina State University’s college of engineering in which students devised a glove that controlled computer operations with sensors in the fingertips. Now there is a company called Bellco that is marketing a wireless air mouse glove to the community at large.

So would a wireless mouse glove actually alleviate wrist pain? Common wrist and hand problems range from carpal tunnel to tendonitis due to keeping the hand and wrist at odd angles during the day. A mouse glove would not require you to keep your hand on the desk, you could basically be in a relaxed position all day long. So why isn’t something like this catching on? I’m guessing that it has to do with control. Our movements are human, and when there is exact work to be done on computers (such as graphic design) more precise movements are needed, which when the hand is steadied on a desk or wrist rest is possible. A floating hand relies on too many other active muscles to keep steady. Think about the difference between using a tripod for a camera and not using one.

Keeping with hand ergonomics but moving over to gaming there is the Avenger Xbox 360 Adapter by N-Control. Not billed as an ergonomic device, rather a fully customizable one, the Avenger is about as ergonomic as you can get with a console gaming controller. It snaps on to the Xbox 360 controller and you can move the buttons & triggers around to fit not only your hand but your gaming style as well. Something to think about for those with itchy trigger fingers, you can also adjust the response time. For someone like me who has broken every finger at some point in life and some don’t work as they should, this is a fantastic device. Often I get hand cramps when gaming (as many gamers do) and being able to adjust the controller to an ergonomically sound position based on the layout & comfort of my hand is pretty sweet.

The thing is, gamers are one group that might not think about ergonomics mostly because of their age range. A lot of gamers are young, in their teens or college-aged and haven’t yet experienced the ongoing pain associated with mistreated joints & tendons. Gamers put themselves in a position to get anything from back & shoulder pain to neck pain to eye strain. Though here at Gunnar, the solution to eye strain is pretty clear. If there is one ergonomic item that has changed my life for the better, it’s my MLG Phantoms. But even solving eye strain with a sweet pair of Gunnars isn’t going to clear up severe neck issues from sitting at a bad angle and not having proper back support.

Thankfully, there are plenty of awesome gaming chairs in the market. My favorite has to be this one, the PCE Ultimate Gaming Station & Work Space. All you would need to do is install a Mountain Dew fountain and you’d be good to go. The point is, like many gaming chairs, it sets the body at an angle that doesn’t put undue pressure on the joints and tendons. So basically, you can game longer. Also, for those gamers that prefer some more “human” games every once in a while, there is this.

Of course, what would any market segment be without the totally off the wall stuff? Take for instance the Adapta Mouse. Designer Ryo Yoshimi has created a functional and ergonomically sound (I suppose) mouse that looks like a centerpiece at a very neo-classical wine bar. Then there is the DataHand, a throwback from 1990 that use a radial menu to select letters, basically replacing your movement across the keyboard with a finger twitch. Obviously, while very smart ergonomics, it didn’t catch on. Another great design that was flawed as far as marketing is the Combimouse.Come to think of it, the name might have been a bit flawed as well. The keyboard split in two to adapt to a more natural hand resting position, and the mouse was also incorporated into the keyboard and split in two. Probably would take a bit of getting used to.

When we sit down at our desks, or in front of our gaming console we don’t always consider the damage we could be doing to our bodies by not simply sitting in an ergonomically sound position. As you can see, there are plenty of great products on the market to assist with that so that we can keep gaming for years to come without having to take a baggie full of meds every morning. Ergonomics has become more than just a gel thing on your desk you end up destroying with paper-clips, it has become something we all need to think about as we go through our day to day lives. The long term effects of things such as tendon damage and eye strain are something we need to take seriously now.

For some great ergonomic supplies, after you get yourself a pair of Gunnars, check out ergopro.com.